US drug shortages are all-time high

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Drug shortages in the US are at an all-time high, and some of the medications in short supply are life-saving chemotherapy drugs and emergency medications stored in hospitals, pharmacists warn.
The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) and Utah Drug Information Service reported that there were 323 active drug shortages in the first quarter of the year, marking the most shortages since they have been tracking the data since 2001.
It surpassed the previous record of 320 shortages in 2014, according to the data.
The “ongoing national shortages of therapies for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder also remain a serious challenge for clinicians and patients,” Abramowitz added.
Abramowitz continued to stress that more work needs to be done at the federal level to fix the root cause of the issue.
“ASHP will continue to engage with policymakers regularly as we guide efforts to draft and pass new legislation to address drug shortages and continue to strongly advocate on behalf of our members for solutions that work,” he said.
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a white paper last week recommending ways Congress can assist with the issue.
“With today’s white paper, HHS offers solutions and stands ready to work with Congress to ensure no patient faces the devastating consequences of drug shortages or goes without needed medicines,” it said in a press release.

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A number of pharmaceuticals, including life-saving chemotherapy drugs and emergency medications kept in hospitals, are in short supply due to the ongoing drug shortage in the United States, pharmacists warn.

According to the Utah Drug Information Service and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), there were 323 active drug shortages in the first quarter of this year—the highest number since the data collection began in 2001.

According to the data, it exceeded the previous record of 320 shortages in 2014.

Paul Abramowitz, CEO of ASHP, cautioned that drug shortages can affect any class of medication, but that “some of the most worrying shortages involve generic sterile injectable medications, including cancer chemotherapy drugs and emergency medications stored in hospital crash carts and procedural areas,” according to his statement. “.

Medication for pain and sedation, Rho(D) immune globulin, oxytocin, standard chemotherapy, and ADHD medications are examples of these.

Adding to the difficulty faced by doctors and patients, Abramowitz stated that there is a persistent lack of treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in the country.

Demand exceeding supply leads to shortages in the short term, but “the most severe and persistent shortages are driven by economic factors that undermine investment in manufacturing capacity, manufacturing quality, and supply chain reliability,” per an ASHP report released separately.

As per the ASHP, “the intense pricing rivalry among generic manufacturers is the primary cause of these economic difficulties.”.

Abramowitz persisted in emphasizing that additional federal action is required to address the underlying cause of the problem.

In addition to vehemently advocating for practical solutions on behalf of its members, ASHP “will continue to engage with policymakers on a regular basis as we guide efforts to draft and pass new legislation to address drug shortages.”.

Last week, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released a white paper outlining suggestions for how Congress can help with the problem.

The agency said in a press release that “with today’s white paper, HHS offers solutions and stands ready to work with Congress to ensure no patient faces the devastating consequences of drug shortages or goes without needed medicines.”.

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