The gun store owner sold hundreds of high-capacity magazines in 90 minutes

Precise News

KELSO, Wash. — In the roughly 90 minutes that selling high-capacity gun magazines was legal in Washington on Monday, a Kelso gun store owner sold hundreds of magazines to hundreds of customers before the state stepped in and successfully had the ban reinstated.
The result: a statewide ban on the sale, manufacture, distribution and import of gun magazines with a capacity of more than 10 rounds remains in place — for now.
A hearing is set for April 17, with escalation to the state Supreme Court possible.
Wentz is behind the court challenge to Washington’s high-capacity magazine ban, with the help of the Silent Majority Foundation.
State Senator Patty Kuderer, a Democrat representing Bellevue who sponsored the magazine ban legislation, expressed confidence that the ban will prevail in higher courts.
A hearing with the commissioner of the Washington Supreme Court is set for April 17 to determine if the emergency stay remains in place.
The attorney general’s office will, on April 23, argue that the case should be sent directly to the state’s Supreme Court, bypassing the traditional appellate process.
The Washington Supreme Court will make this decision.

NEUTRAL

KELSO, Washington. — A Kelso gun store owner sold hundreds of magazines to hundreds of customers during the roughly 90 minutes that selling high-capacity gun magazines was legal in Washington on Monday. However, the state intervened and successfully had the ban reinstated.

The Washington Supreme Court promptly granted a request for an emergency stay on the order requested by the Washington Attorney General’s office, after a Cowlitz County judge overturned the state’s ban on high capacity magazines on Monday, ruling it to be unconstitutional.

As a result, a statewide ban on the production, importation, sale, and distribution of firearm magazines holding more than ten rounds is still in effect.

A possible escalation to the state Supreme Court is indicated by the April 17 hearing date.

Monday was “magazine day” at Wally Wentz’s Gator’s Custom Guns in Kelso. With support from the Silent Majority Foundation, Wentz is the driving force behind the legal challenge against Washington’s ban on large-capacity magazines.

Wentz opened his business on a day off, posted a message on Facebook, and tried to sell as many magazines as he could after a Cowlitz County judge made a favorable ruling in his favor on Monday.

Wentz described the customers who stopped by as “a flow of constant thank yous, ‘Do you have this,’ ‘Do you have that,’ ‘How many can I have?'”. “I said, ‘What’s your limit on your gold card?'” “Is there a limit?”.

Following the first decision, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said in a statement that the magazine ban is crucial to stopping mass shootings because it saves lives.

Wentz said he always anticipated an appeal, even after achieving a victory in Cowlitz County court.

“It will be a difficult debate to dismiss this,” he remarked. It will definitely smell like fish if they do. “.

The Bellevue Democrat who sponsored the magazine ban legislation, state senator Patty Kuderer, expressed confidence that the ban will hold up in higher courts.

It doesn’t affect someone’s right to own a gun, Kuderer claimed. “They’ll view this as a public safety issue, which it is.”. The quantity of shots that can be discharged simultaneously is simply restricted. ****.

Robert Schentrup, whose sister Carmen was killed in the 2018 high school shooting in Parkland, Florida, expressed his frustration and anxiety that the law may be changed, but he said he will continue to advocate for stricter gun laws.

“I genuinely believe that Carmen’s death would have been in vain if I did nothing to address it—just try to forget that it ever happened,” Schentrup stated. We can make it mean something by using it as a catalyst for both my own and other people’s action. ****.

Wentz stated that he is awaiting a court ruling in order to restock the high-capacity magazines at his establishment. He claimed that the ban cost him between 30 and 40 percent of his business, and he would not think twice about appealing the decision to the U.S. s. Supreme Court.

“We’re going to appeal if we do not win there, just as we knew the state would this week,” he declared. “There will be a dogfight if we approach those people wearing black dresses. “.”.

On April 17, there will be a hearing with the Washington Supreme Court commissioner to decide whether to extend the emergency stay.

On April 23, the attorney general’s office is going to make the case that the case ought to go straight to the state Supreme Court instead of going through the customary appellate procedure. The Supreme Court of Washington will decide this case.

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