Taroko National Park was closed after the earthquake

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The Taroko National Park in eastern Taiwan, a popular destination for domestic and international tourists alike, will close until further notice, after the island was struck by the strongest earthquake in 25 years last week.
“All levels of trails and facilities within the Taroko National Park jurisdiction have been damaged.
In order to ensure the safety of visitors, the park will continue to close all trails and visitor service stations in the park from today and suspend services,” the park said in a statement.
“During the closure period, the park will continue to carry out road and trail repair work and assess the safety of the park.
All 32 trails within the park are closed, the park’s website shows.
The 920-square-kilometer (9,990 square foot) area was declared a National Park of Taiwan in 1986.
In an interview with Taiwan’s official Central News Agency, deputy director of the Taroko National Park Headquarters Lin Chung-shan said the Hehuan Mountain area, which lies partially within the park, was relatively less impacted and will gradually reopen.
The Taroko National Park attracted 3.45 million visitors in 2023, according to statistics provided by the Hualien Tourism Department.

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Following the strongest earthquake to strike the island in 25 years last week, the popular tourist destination in eastern Taiwan, Taroko National Park, will remain closed until further notice.

“Trails and facilities at every level within Taroko National Park’s jurisdiction have sustained damage. In order to ensure the safety of visitors, the park will continue to close all trails and visitor service stations in the park from today and suspend services,” the park said in a statement.

“The park will continue to maintain its roads and trails and evaluate its overall safety throughout the closure period. The park said, “A separate announcement will be made regarding the reopening time following the closure.

The statement also stated that permits to enter the ecological protected areas in Shei-Pa, Taroko, and Yushan National Parks are currently being rescinded, so visitors will need to reapply once they have recovered from the earthquake.

On the park’s website, it is stated that all 32 trails are closed.

In 1986, the 920 square kilometers (9,990 square feet) of land were designated as a Taiwan National Park.

The magnitude 7.4 earthquake caused significant damage to many parts of Taroko Gorge, including the Tunnel of Nine Turns and Shakadang Trail. Taroko Gorge is known for its rugged terrain, steep cliffs, and majestic views. These landslides and rockfalls occurred after the earthquake.

The Taroko National Park Headquarters deputy director, Lin Chung-shan, stated in an interview with Taiwan’s official Central News Agency that the Hehuan Mountain area, which is partially within the park, was comparatively less affected and will reopen gradually.

According to data from the Hualien Tourism Department, 3.45 million people visited the Taroko National Park in 2023.

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