South Sudan closes schools because of the heat

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South Sudan is closing all schools from Monday in preparation for an extreme heatwave expected to last two weeks.
The health and education ministries have advised parents to keep all children indoors as temperatures are expected to soar to 45C (113F).
They warned that any school found open during the warning period would have its registration withdrawn, but the statement issued late on Saturday did not specify how long schools would remain closed.
The ministries said they “will continue to monitor the situation and inform the public accordingly”.
Peter Garang, who lives in the capital, Juba, welcomed the decision.
He said schools should be connected to the electricity grid to enable the installation of air conditioners.
South Sudan, one of the world’s youngest nations, is particularly vulnerable to the climate crisis with heatwaves common but rarely exceeding 40C (104F).
Civil conflict has plagued the east African country, which also suffers drought and flooding, making living conditions difficult.
The World Food Programme in its latest country brief said South Sudan “continues to face a dire humanitarian crisis” due to violence, economic instability, climate change and an influx of people fleeing the conflict in neighbouring Sudan.
It also stated that 818,000 vulnerable people were given food and cash-based transfers in January.

To get ready for an intense heatwave that is predicted to last two weeks, South Sudan is closing all of its schools starting on Monday.

With temperatures predicted to soar to 45C (113F), the health and education ministries have advised parents to keep all children indoors.

The statement released late on Saturday did not say how long schools would be closed, but it did threaten to revoke the registration of any school found to be open during the warning period.

The ministries declared that they “will keep an eye on the situation and update the public accordingly.”.

Juba resident Peter Garang applauded the decision. According to him, in order to install air conditioners, schools ought to be connected to the electrical grid.

As one of the newest countries on Earth, South Sudan is especially susceptible to the climate crisis; heatwaves are frequent but seldom reach temperatures above 40C (104F). Living conditions are difficult in the east African nation due to civil conflict, drought, and flooding.

South Sudan “continues to face a dire humanitarian crisis” as a result of violence, economic instability, climate change, and an influx of people fleeing the conflict in neighboring Sudan, according to the World Food Programme’s most recent country brief. Additionally, it said that in January, 818,000 individuals who were at risk received food and cash transfers.

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