Russia opens a new front in the war

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Ukrainian troops, backed by billions of dollars worth of U.S. weapons, are expected to limit Russian gains.
The intensified fighting comes as Ukraine has been outgunned, running low on ammunition and waiting for a new $60 billion package of U.S. military aid to take effect.
Ukraine war:Blinken visits Kyiv as Russia ramps up military offensive Russia seeks a Ukraine buffer zone Since last week, Russia has advanced about two to five miles in Ukraine’s northeast, mostly over open terrain.
He said that, as of Thursday, after Ukraine’s military sent reinforcements to the area, Russian forces have stopped advancing in northeastern Ukraine.
Neither Ukraine’s military nor its military intelligence agency returned a request for comment on whether Russia’s activity near Kharkiv represented a major change in the war’s trajectory.
The soldier also expressed frustration over U.S. military aid.
Each day, nearly 900 Russian troops are killed or wounded in action, according to an estimate released May 4 by British Defense Intelligence.
Since Russia launched its illegal invasion in Feb. 2022, more than 465,000 Russian troops have been killed or wounded, British Intelligence estimates.

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In the vicinity of the important Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, a fresh Russian offensive has reclaimed miles of territory; however, a wave of U. s. , a breakthrough is unlikely due to Russia’s arsenal of weapons and its incapacity to coordinate its air force and ground forces. s. authorities and military pundits.

Fighting is intensifying along a 700-mile front, and Russian drones, missiles, and shelling continue to threaten Ukrainians. Ukrainian troops, backed by billions of dollars worth of U. s. arms, are anticipated to restrict Russian gains. However, as Russian artillery approaches, Kharkiv, the second-largest city northeast of Kyiv, may experience additional bombing.

Interviews with U.S. officials support the theory that Russia’s gains in the grueling, two-year war of attrition have been incremental. s. as well as military professionals, intelligence analysts, and Ukrainian officials.

Seth Jones, the director of the international security program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank, stated that while the Ukrainians are not in danger of losing, they are also not winning at this time. “Neither peace negotiations nor Ukrainian interest in them are taking place. Russia considers itself to be in the lead. “.

The intensified fighting comes as Ukraine has been outgunned, running low on ammunition and waiting for a new $60 billion package of U. s. for military aid to be effective.

Brighten travels to Kiev amid Russia’s escalating military assault in the Ukraine war.

Russia desires a buffer zone around Ukraine.

In the northeast of Ukraine, Russia has advanced two to five miles since last week, mostly over open territory. According to a U.S. official, it has not yet reached Ukraine’s first defense. S. authoritative. Speaking anonymously, the official expressed concern that Kharkiv may come under Russian artillery fire as a result of the Russian advance. To be precise, U. S. Authorities think that in order to stop cross-border attacks that have targeted Russian cities close to the border, Russia is attempting to create a buffer zone in northeastern Ukraine.

The official stated that while a Russian military advance does not seem likely, months of ceaseless fighting, a lack of reinforcements, and running out of ammunition have made Ukrainian morale and manpower a problem. According to the official, Ukraine’s defenses have been weakened by Congress’s failure to provide the $60 billion military aid package, which has reduced the air defenses necessary to thwart Russian missile and glide-bomb attacks.

As things stand in Ukraine, the war is largely dependent on U.S. assistance. S. weaponry.

The official said that with the recent approval of the aid package, ammunition is now reaching the front lines in Ukraine. According to the official, Ukraine has taken steps to expand the eligibility of youth for military service, which may offer some respite.

Nevertheless, Mykola Bielieskov, a military research fellow at the National Institute for Strategic Studies in Ukraine, stated via a WhatsApp message that it was “extremely challenging to respond” to the query of when the new U. s. It would matter if Ukraine received military assistance.

Bielieskov also stated last week that although “the renewed presence of Russian troops in northern Ukraine marks a significant escalation in the war,” Russia’s “immediate military goals look to be rather limited” in a different blog post for the Atlantic Council think tank. According to Bielieskov, this could alter because Russia has stationed up to 35,000 soldiers on its side of the border. But he told USA TODAY that any suggestions Russia was close to capturing Kharkiv or on the verge of a military breakthrough went “way too far. ****.

Phillips P. O’Brien teaches strategic security studies at the University of St. Scotland’s Andrews concurred with that assessment. He claimed that Russian forces had ceased their advance into northeastern Ukraine as of Thursday, following the deployment of reinforcements by the Ukrainian military.

O’Brien stated, “Let’s see if they can take Vovchansk, a small town, first.”.

coordinating warplanes, tanks, and soldiers.

According to Jones, Russia is unable to breach Ukraine’s defense because of its difficulties in coordinating soldiers and tanks with aircraft overhead. The air defense system of Ukraine has hindered Russia’s ability to provide its ground forces with the necessary cover to enable significant advances.

Neither Ukraine’s military nor its military intelligence agency returned a request for comment on whether Russia’s activity near Kharkiv represented a major change in the war’s trajectory.

At least four towns in northeastern Ukraine—Hlyboke, Neskuchne, Starytsya, and Vovchansk—have seen Russian forces seize territory in recent days, according to a set of maps released on Wednesday by the Washington-based think tank Institute for the Study of War. The maps are based on readily available information.

In remarks that accompanied the maps, the ISW stated, “After Russian forces first seized areas that Ukrainian officials have now confirmed were less defended, the tempo of Russian offensive operations in northern Kharkiv Oblast continues to decrease.”.

lost the chance to place landmines.

One Ukrainian soldier involved in reconnaissance missions in the Kharkiv region said he expected the Russians to mount a larger offensive push there, and in Ukraine’s neighboring Sumy region, in the coming days.

But he didn’t believe that Kharkiv would fall into Russian hands very soon. He claimed that a few of the towns that are presently under conflict northeast of Kharkiv were not adequately prepared for defense.

For example, he believed Ukraine squandered an opportunity over the last few months to place landmines and other defensive weapons around Vovchansk and other towns near Kharkiv that could have slowed its enemy’s advance. The soldier was not authorized to speak with the media, so he asked to remain anonymous.

The soldier also conveyed his annoyance with U. s. military aid.

He stated that since the war began over two years ago, the United States has given Ukraine enough armaments to survive and retaliate against Russia, but not enough to help them win the conflict. Even with the most recent round of U.S. sanctions, the soldier claimed he had not seen any new evidence that this had changed. s. aid.

Russia’s small gains have come at a huge cost.

Each day, nearly 900 Russian troops are killed or wounded in action, according to an estimate released May 4 by British Defense Intelligence. Russia began its illegitimate invasion in February. 2022, more than 465,000 Russian troops have been killed or wounded, British Intelligence estimates.

As it continues its offensive, it is anticipated that Russia will suffer more casualties during the summer. By summer, Jones said, the number of dead and injured could exceed 500,000.

So far, Russian President Vladimir Putin has been able to squelch domestic resistance by sending troops from Siberia, Central Asia and prison inmates, Jones said. The sons of elites from Moscow and St. Petersburg have escaped so far.

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