Noem was banned by the seventh Native American tribe

The Hill

A seventh Native American tribe in South Dakota has banned Gov.
Kristi Noem (R) from its reservation after she commented earlier this year that tribal leaders benefited from drug cartels.
The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe in central South Dakota voted Tuesday to ban Noem from its reservation, citing her cartel comments, the tribe confirmed on social media.
The vote means just two of her state’s nine reservations have not banned Noem from visiting.
“And about the remarks she made about the children being nobodies their whole lives because of the parents.” The Hill has reached out to the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe for further comment.
Peter Lengkeek, chair of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, pushed back against this allegation, stating the tribe does not have cartels on the reservations, NPR reported.
Relations between Native American tribes in South Dakota and Noem have been strained since she took office in 2019, but her recent comments have further fanned the flames.
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe spokesperson Alli Moran told The Hill last month that numerous tribes “share the same sentiments” regarding Noem, specifically that she does not respect or “fully understand” tribal sovereignty.

NEGATIVE

A seventh South Dakota Native American tribe has outlawed Gov. Kristi Noem (R) from its reservation following her remarks made earlier in the year indicating that drug cartels benefited tribal leaders.

Citing Noem’s remarks about cartels, the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe in central South Dakota voted on Tuesday to ban her from their reservation. The tribe verified the decision on social media.

According to the vote, Noem is only permitted to visit two of the nine reservations in her state.

Tribal council member Kyle Loudner told The Dakota Scout, “The people voted unanimously to ban her along with the tribal council for her derogatory remarks about the tribes and cartels.”. Additionally, she mentioned how the parents make the kids feel like nobody for the rest of their lives. “.

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe has been contacted by The Hill for additional remarks.

“At a forum in March, the governor stated that he believed certain tribal leaders were personally benefiting from the cartels’ presence, which is why they consistently attack me,”.

However, I will stand up for the people who genuinely reside in those circumstances, who daily text and call me to beg you to please come to Pine Ridge and assist us, governor. With a reference to her state’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Noem said, “We are scared.”.

According to NPR, Crow Creek Sioux Tribe Chair Peter Lengkeek refuted this claim, saying the tribe does not have cartels operating on its reservations.

“We have goods from cartels, such as drugs and weapons. However, in order to reach the reservation, they cross state highways. According to NPR, he stated, “So, lumping us all together and claiming that all tribes are involved in this really shows to the ignorance of the governor’s office.”.

For further information, The Hill contacted Noem’s office.

Noem’s administration has had tense relations with South Dakota’s Native American tribes ever since she took office in 2019, and her most recent remarks have only fueled tensions.

Noem has been mentioned as a possible running mate for former President Trump; however, some tribes have accused Noem of making decisions to support Trump’s campaign.

Many tribes “share the same sentiments” about Noem, specifically that she does not respect or “fully understand” tribal sovereignty, according to Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe spokesperson Alli Moran, who spoke with The Hill last month.

Last week, Noem urged tribes to support her law enforcement initiatives, defending her remarks in spite of the bans.

scroll to top