India will implement an asylum law that excludes Muslims

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POSITIVE
India’s government moved abruptly Monday to implement a citizenship law that excludes Muslims from a naturalization fast track.
It stoked massive protests and deadly riots when it passed in 2019.
The move came weeks ahead of a national election in which Prime Minister Narendra Modi is set to seek a third term.
The Citizenship Amendment Act provides non-Muslims from neighboring countries with a path to Indian citizenship.
It applies to asylum claims filed by Hindus, Sikhs, Parsis, Buddhists, Jains and Christians from Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh who fled to the Hindu-majority India before 2015 — but not Muslims, who make up a majority in the three countries.
Critics say a law that uses religion as a criterion for citizenship violates the secularism embraced by the country’s founders.
The law, which Modi delayed implementing over the unrest it prompted, has stoked fears of the potential for a broader effort to strip citizenship from Muslims in India who lack documents.
AdvertisementThe announcement by Modi’s government that it would begin to enforce the act nationwide drew cheers from Hindu nationalist groups in India and abroad.
The groups see the law as a step in making India a sanctuary for Hindus and lending the Indian state a more explicitly religious character.
The unrest so far has been relatively limited, compared with the bloodshed that erupted in 2019 over the measure.
Share this article ShareDuring the protests four years ago, videos spread online of police assaulting students in a library at a Muslim-majority university in New Delhi.
Two months later, deadly riots erupted as then-President Donald Trump visited the city.
More than 50 people died, and more than 100 of those detained are still in jail, according to local media reports.
The upheaval left the law’s fate in limbo.
At the time, the U.N. Commissioner for Human Rights had called the act “fundamentally discriminatory in nature and in breach of India’s international human rights obligations.”AdvertisementIn southern Tamil Nadu state, many ethnic Tamils have decried the fast-track program’s exclusion of Tamil Muslims who fled Sri Lanka.
State leader M.K.
Stalin, who hails from a Tamil political party, called the act divisive and said his state would not implement it.
In northeast India’s Assam state, protests broke out over fears that a sudden influx of non-Muslim migrants from neighboring Bangladesh might change the local cultural fabric.
On university campuses in New Delhi, which were hotbeds of protests in 2019, dozens of students were detained, largely as a preemptive measure, by police.
Amit Shah, Modi’s right-hand man and the powerful home minister who is set to oversee the program, argued that the act would only provide a home to those who are persecuted, not take citizenship away from others.
Opposition parties in the country have criticized Modi for ushering in the new act just before the election and accused his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) of using divisive measures to appeal to Hindu voters.
The BJP is widely expected to win in national elections to be held between April and May.
The government is seeking “polarization and distraction,” Sanjay Hegde, a lawyer who argues cases before India’s Supreme Court, said in an interview with journalist Barkha Dutt on Tuesday.
“Fundamentally, this is the objection to the CAA: That we are a country which does not have a preferred religion or a despised religion,” Hegde said.

A citizenship law that bars Muslims from a fast track to naturalization was abruptly implemented by the Indian government on Monday. When it was passed in 2019, it sparked violent riots and widespread protests. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is scheduled to run for a third term in the national election a few weeks from now.

It is possible for non-Muslims living in nearby nations to become citizens of India through the Citizenship Amendment Act. It covers asylum claims made before 2015 by Hindus, Sikhs, Parsis, Buddhists, Jains, and Christians who fled to India, a country with a predominantly Hindu population, from Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Bangladesh; it does not, however, apply to Muslims, who constitute the majority in the three countries.

The secularism upheld by the nation’s founders is allegedly violated by a law that utilizes religion as a criterion for citizenship. Fears of a wider attempt to deprive Muslims in India without documentation of their citizenship have been heightened by the law, whose implementation Modi postponed due to the unrest it caused.

Promoting something.

Hindu nationalist organizations in India and overseas applauded the announcement made by Modi’s administration that the act would be implemented nationwide. The groups see the law as a step toward endowing the Indian state with a more overtly religious nature and turning India into a haven for Hindus. Compared to the violence that broke out over the measure in 2019, the unrest to date has been comparatively mild.

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Videos of cops abusing students in a library at a New Delhi university with a majority Muslim student body went viral during the protests four years ago. When then-President Donald Trump visited the city two months later, violent riots broke out. According to reports in the local media, over 50 people lost their lives, and over 100 of those who were arrested are still behind bars.

The law’s future remained uncertain due to the uproar. At the moment, the U.S. Not N. The act was deemed “fundamentally discriminatory in nature and in breach of India’s international human rights obligations” by the Commissioner for Human Rights. “.

promotion.

Numerous ethnic Tamils in the southern state of Tamil Nadu have protested the fast-track program’s exclusion of Tamil Muslims who fled Sri Lanka. M.K, the state chief. Stalin, a member of a political party from Tamil Nadu, described the act as divisive and declared that his state would not execute it. Protests erupted in the state of Assam in northeast India due to concerns that a sudden flood of non-Muslim migrants from Bangladesh, a neighboring country, might alter the local way of life. Numerous students were arrested by police, mainly as a preventive measure, on university campuses in New Delhi, which were the epicenters of protests in 2019.

Modi’s deputy Amit Shah, a formidable home minister who will be in charge of the initiative, contended that the act would only give asylum to those who are being persecuted and would not deprive anyone of their citizenship.

The country’s opposition parties have attacked Prime Minister Modi for enacting the new law so close to the election and charged that his ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) is exploiting polarizing tactics to win over Hindu voters. It’s generally anticipated that the BJP will prevail in the April–May national elections.

Sanjay Hegde, a lawyer who represents clients before India’s Supreme Court, claimed in an interview with journalist Barkha Dutt on Tuesday that the government is looking for “polarization and distraction.”.

Hegde stated, “The fundamental objection to the CAA is that we are a nation without a favored or hated religion.

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