A restaurant gas explosion is captured in a dash cam video

None

NEGATIVE
Two people were killed and over two dozen more were injured in northern China on Wednesday when a suspected gas leak blew out the front of a multistory building and caused its partial collapse.
Authorities in Yanjiao, a town in the city of Sanhe in northern Hebei province, said first responders reported mostly minor injuries to 26 victims, who were being treated at local hospitals.
The town of around 350,000 people is located 21 miles east of downtown Beijing.
The early morning blast happened at just before 8 a.m. local time and was captured by a nearby vehicle’s dashcam.
The footage later shared to Weibo, China’s largest social media website, showed a loud blast spewing smoke and debris onto the road ahead.
Witness videos taken in the aftermath of the incident showed the burning partial remains of the building, which local media outlets said had housed a fried kitchen restaurant on the ground floor.
The Weibo images additionally showed extensive damage to nearby vehicles, stores and residential buildings, with multiple witnesses in the surrounding area reporting shattered windows, according to state news outlets.
An image circulating on the Chinese social media website Weibo shows the aftermath after a suspected gas explosion in Yanjiao, in Sanhe city in China’s northern Hebei province, on March 13.
An image circulating on the Chinese social media website Weibo shows the aftermath after a suspected gas explosion in Yanjiao, in Sanhe city in China’s northern Hebei province, on March 13.
WeiboThe fire department of Langfang, which administers Sanhe, said in a public statement that the incident happened at an intersection on one of the town’s busy thoroughfares.
It dispatched 36 fire trucks and more than 150 firefighters to the scene.
Sanhe’s Emergency Management Bureau said it evacuated residents within a 1,600-foot radius of the explosion, which its preliminarily findings suggested was caused by a suspected natural gas leak.
Local media reports quoted residents as saying the distinct smell of gas was left lingering in the air after the incident.
One of the town’s two gas utility providers told a Chinese news site that inspections of local pipelines were ongoing, and that utility services had been temporarily suspended to 50 residential communities in the meantime.
The city’s Emergency Management Bureau did not disclose the identities of the two deceased victims.
Its public information office did not answer calls seeking comment.
China’s high rate of infrastructure and industrial accidents is often attributed to factors including imbalanced economic development between urban and rural areas, a lack of strict regulatory enforcement and sometimes corruption.
In August 2015, an explosion at a chemical storage facility in the northern port city of Tianjin killed an estimated 173 people including 104 first responders.
Central natural gas supplies or propane tanks are commonly used for cooking in many households in the country.
Policymakers in Beijing have sought to reduce civil gas energy accidents by enforcing compliance, increasing the frequency of inspections and raising public awareness about gas usage.

A suspected gas leak caused a multistory building in northern China to blow out its front and partially collapse on Wednesday, killing two people and injuring over twenty.

According to officials in Yanjiao, a town in the northern Hebei province city of Sanhe, first responders found that 26 victims, most of whom had minor injuries, were receiving treatment at nearby hospitals. About 350,000 people live in the town, which is situated 21 miles east of Beijing’s city center.

It was just before eight in the morning when the explosion occurred. m. local time and was recorded by the dashcam of a nearby car. Later, the loud explosion was captured on camera, spewing smoke and debris onto the road ahead, which was posted to Weibo, the biggest social media platform in China.

The building, which local media outlets reported had a fried kitchen restaurant on the ground floor, was partially destroyed by fire and could be seen in witness videos shot in the aftermath of the incident.

In addition, the Weibo photos revealed significant damage to neighboring cars, shops, and residential buildings. Several witnesses in the vicinity reported broken windows, according to state news agencies.

On March 13, there was a suspected gas explosion in Yanjiao, Sanhe city, in the northern Hebei province of China. An image of the scene is making the rounds on the Chinese social media platform Weibo. On March 13, there was a suspected gas explosion in Yanjiao, Sanhe city, in the northern Hebei province of China. An image of the scene is making the rounds on the Chinese social media platform Weibo. Weibo.

The incident took place at an intersection on one of the town’s main thoroughfares, according to a public statement released by Langfang’s fire department, which is in charge of managing Sanhe. Over 150 firefighters and 36 fire trucks were sent to the scene.

Residents in a 1,600-foot radius around the explosion were evacuated, according to Sanhe’s Emergency Management Bureau, whose preliminary investigation revealed the explosion was likely caused by a suspected natural gas leak.

According to local media reports, residents reported that following the incident, there was a noticeable gas smell in the air.

A Chinese news site was informed by one of the town’s two gas utility providers that utility services had been temporarily suspended to fifty residential communities while local pipeline inspections were taking place.

The identities of the two deceased victims were not released by the city’s Emergency Management Bureau. When contacted for comment, the public information office did not pick up.

The high frequency of industrial and infrastructure accidents in China is frequently ascribed to a number of issues, such as the unequal economic development of urban and rural regions, lax enforcement of regulations, and occasionally corruption.

An explosion in August 2015 killed approximately 173 people, including 104 first responders, at a chemical storage facility in the northern port city of Tianjin.

For cooking, many homes across the nation use propane tanks or central natural gas supplies.

Beijing’s policymakers have enforced compliance, increased inspection frequency, and increased public awareness of gas usage in an effort to reduce accidents involving civil gas energy.

Leave a Reply

scroll to top