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Precise News

Washington — Missouri death row inmate Brian Dorsey was executed on Tuesday evening after the U.S. Supreme Court declined to intervene, officials confirmed.
The state carried out Dorsey’s death sentence by lethal injection at Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center in Bonne Terre, Missouri’s Department of Corrections said in a statement.
The execution proceeded on Tuesday evening after the high court rejected two separate bids to intervene.
Mike Parson, a Republican, confirmed Monday that the state would move forward with Dorsey’s death sentence, rejecting a separate request for clemency.
Dorsey, 52, was the first inmate in Missouri to be executed this year after four were put to death in 2023.
“If anyone deserves mercy, surely it is Brian, who has been fully rehabilitated and whose death sentence was so flawed that five of his jurors believe he should not be executed,” Henderson said in a statement.
“Executing Brian Dorsey is a pointless cruelty, an exercise of the state’s power that serves no legitimate penological purpose.”
After failed appeals of his death sentence, the Missouri Supreme Court issued an execution warrant in December.

NEUTRAL

Washington — Brian Dorsey, a death row inmate from Missouri, was put to death on Tuesday night following the U. s. Authorities verified that the Supreme Court declined to get involved.

Nearly twenty years ago, Dorsey was found guilty of the murders of his cousin and her husband.

According to a release from the Missouri Department of Corrections, the state executed Dorsey by lethal injection at the Eastern Reception, Diagnostic and Correctional Center in Bonne Terre. At 6:11 p.m., he was pronounced deceased. M. time zone specific.

The high court denied two separate requests to intervene, so Tuesday night’s execution went forward. No notable dissents were found. Missouri Gov. Republican Mike Parson affirmed on Monday that the state would carry out Dorsey’s death sentence, turning down a different plea for clemency.

In addition to Dorsey’s attorneys claiming that he was in a drug-induced psychosis when he carried out the killings in 2006, over seventy current and former corrections officers had urged Parson to reduce Dorsey’s sentence, citing his rehabilitation.

Dorsey, 52, was Missouri’s first execution victim this year; four others were executed in 2023.

The state’s decision to carry out the execution was questioned by Kirk Henderson, Dorsey’s lawyer.

Henderson released a statement in which she said, “If anyone deserves mercy, surely it is Brian, who has been fully rehabilitated and whose death sentence was so flawed that five of his jurors believe he should not be executed.”. “Brian Dorsey’s prosecution is an unnecessary act of brutality and an abuse of state authority that has no justifiable criminal function. “.

In December of last year, Dorsey entered a guilty plea to the shooting deaths of his cousin Sarah Bonnie and her husband Ben Bonnie at their residence. 23.06. In court documents, it is stated that Dorsey had called his cousin to ask for money to give two drug dealers at his apartment. Later that evening, the three came back to the Bonnies’ house because they had agreed to work with him.

Following their daughter’s bedtime, Sarah and Ben Bonnie were shot by Dorsey with a shotgun. Prosecutors then charged Dorsey with his cousin’s sexual assault. Then, according to state officials, he stole a number of goods from the Bonnies’ house, including their car and jewelry, and tried to sell them to pay off his drug debt.

The couple went missing from a Christmas Eve family get-together, and it wasn’t until Sarah Bonnie’s parents visited the house that the bodies were found. Upon entering the home, they discovered the 4-year-old daughter of the couple seated on the couch, telling her grandparents that her mother would not awaken.

Three days after the murders, Dorsey turned himself in to the police and admitted to the crimes. He was then given the death penalty.

The execution warrant was issued by the Missouri Supreme Court in December following the unsuccessful appeal of his death sentence. Dorsey attempted, but was unable, to obtain additional relief on the grounds that his conviction and sentence were unconstitutional under the Sixth Amendment.

In a request for the intervention of the Supreme Court, Dorsey’s attorneys contended that the attorneys chosen to represent him by the Missouri Public Defender Office received a fixed fee of $12,000 each, creating a conflict of interest that directly conflicted with their personal financial interests and denied Dorsey the right to effective legal representation.

In a court filing, Dorsey’s current legal team informed the Supreme Court that his appointed attorneys pushed their client to enter a guilty plea without any assurance that the prosecution would not seek the death penalty and gave “grossly deficient representation” in a capital case.

In a follow-up request, they contended that Dorsey has in his more than 17 years on death row accomplished “remarkable redemption and rehabilitation” and that his execution “will not further the goals of capital punishment.”.

Additionally, the Missouri execution protocol contains no language regarding the use of painkillers, which alarmed Dorsey’s attorneys. As an obese, diabetic, and former intravenous drug user, their client is described in court documents as potentially complicating the establishment of IV lines for the lethal injection and potentially causing Missouri Department of Corrections staff to use “cut downs.”. “.”.

Large incisions are made in the arms, legs, or other body parts, and the tissue is separated from the vein during the procedure. The “cut downs” take place prior to an inmate’s final meeting with their spiritual advisor, which is when Dorsey intends to have the procedure done, according to a federal lawsuit filed on his behalf in Missouri district court. No anesthetic is administered during the procedure.

His legal team contended that Dorsey’s freedom to freely practice his religion would be impeded by the “significant pain and anguish” he would experience upon meeting his spiritual adviser.

According to the Associated Press, a settlement was reached on Saturday, wherein the state agreed to take action to reduce Dorsey’s risk of experiencing severe pain.

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