Toxic emissions from more than 200 chemical plants will be cracked down by the EPA

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The Biden administration will require more than 200 chemical plants to cut their emissions of toxic chemicals as part of a broader effort to reduce cancer cases.
The number of people who have elevated cancer risks because they live within 6 miles of a chemical plant would drop by 96 percent, the EPA said.
Cancer cases within about 31 miles of facilities that release toxic pollution into the air are expected to fall by about 60 percent under the rule.
That’s because the new regulations on 218 chemical plants are expected to cause them to reduce their releases of toxic pollution by more than 6,200 tons per year.
Among the areas expected to benefit from the rule is an area of Louisiana known as “Cancer Alley,” with a large number of chemical plants and high cancer rates, according to the agency.
Today we deliver on that promise with strong final standards to slash pollution, reduce cancer risk and ensure cleaner air for nearby communities,” EPA Administrator Michael Regan said in a written statement.
The emissions of several chemicals are expected to be reduced by the rule.
Additional substances whose emissions are expected to be reduced under the rule include other cancer-causing chemicals like benzene and vinyl chloride.

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In an effort to lower the number of cancer cases overall, the Biden administration will mandate that more than 200 chemical plants reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals they emit.

With the release of its final rules on Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) claimed to have significantly decreased the number of individuals whose exposure to air pollution puts them at higher risk of developing cancer.

According to the EPA, 96 percent fewer people would have increased cancer risks because they reside less than six miles from a chemical plant. This rule is expected to reduce cancer cases by approximately 60% within a 31-mile radius of facilities that emit airborne toxic pollutants.

This is because it is anticipated that 218 chemical plants will reduce their annual releases of toxic pollution by more than 6,200 tons as a result of the new regulations.

According to the agency, “Cancer Alley,” a region of Louisiana with a high cancer incidence and a large number of chemical plants, is one of the places anticipated to benefit from the rule.

It further stated that since low-income and people of color are disproportionately affected by high pollution levels, the issue is one of environmental justice.

“People who are harmed by pollution will be heard, and we will take action to keep them safe. Administrator Michael Regan of the EPA stated in a written statement, “Today we deliver on that promise with strong final standards to slash pollution, reduce cancer risk, and ensure cleaner air for nearby communities.”.

Plants will need to monitor the compounds’ levels at the perimeter, or “fenceline,” of their facilities in addition to limiting their release.

The rule is anticipated to lower the emissions of various chemicals. Among them are the carcinogens chloroprene, which is used to make neoprene, a type of rubber, and the carcinogenic ethylene oxide, which is used in sterilization.

The EPA stated that the rule is anticipated to reduce emissions of these substances by 80 percent for the activities it covers.

Other carcinogenic chemicals like vinyl chloride and benzene are among the others whose emissions are anticipated to decrease as a result of the regulation. Nylon, vinyl chloride, and benzoene are used in the production of plastics, dyes, and other products.

President Biden’s “Cancer Moonshot,” which attempts to avert more than 4 million cancer deaths by 2047, was highlighted by the administration along with this announcement.

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