There is a mystery behind early-onset cancers

Precise News

Study finds accelerated aging tied to increased early-onset cancer risk, urging research into preventive measures tailored to biological age.
“Understanding the factors driving this increase will be key to improve the prevention or early detection of cancers in younger and future generations.” Tian and colleagues hypothesized that increased biological age, indicative of accelerated aging, may contribute to the development of early-onset cancers, often defined as cancers diagnosed in adults younger than 55 years.
“Unlike chronological age, biological age may be influenced by factors such as diet, physical activity, mental health, and environmental stressors,” she added.
Individuals whose biological age was higher than their chronological age were defined as having accelerated aging.
Tian and colleagues first evaluated accelerated aging across birth cohorts and found that individuals born in or after 1965 had a 17% higher likelihood of accelerated aging than those born between 1950 and 1954.
They then evaluated the association between accelerated aging and the risk of early-onset cancers.
They found that each standard deviation increase in accelerated aging was associated with a 42% increased risk of early-onset lung cancer, a 22% increased risk of early-onset gastrointestinal cancer, and a 36% increased risk of early-onset uterine cancer.
“By examining the relationship between accelerating aging and the risk of early-onset cancers, we provide a fresh perspective on the shared etiology of early-onset cancers,” Tian said.

NEUTRAL

Study finds accelerated aging tied to increased early-onset cancer risk, urging research into preventive measures tailored to biological age.

scroll to top