There is a link between type D personality and hypothyroidism

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Summary: Over half of individuals with treated hypothyroidism exhibit a type D personality, characterized by negative emotions and social withdrawal.
Key Facts: Over 50% of people with treated hypothyroidism in the study were found to have a type D personality.
Individuals with type D personality and hypothyroidism reported higher levels of anxiety, depression, and dissatisfaction with treatment outcomes.
“People with hypothyroidism and type D personality may experience more negative treatment outcomes than those without type D personality,” said study author Petros Perros, M.D., of Newcastle University in Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K. “We think that there are two likely interpretations, which may not be mutually exclusive – type D personality and hypothyroidism share similar underlying causes, or people with type D personality may perceive treatment outcomes more negatively.” They confirmed some patients with hypothyroidism were dissatisfied with their care and experienced persistent unexplained symptoms.
“Hypothyroidism and Type D Personality: Results From E-MPATHY, a Cross-sectional International Online Patient Survey” by Petros Perros et al.
Objective To investigate type D personality in hypothyroidism and explore associations with other characteristics and patient-reported outcomes.
Discussion Our study found a high prevalence of type D personality among people with hypothyroidism who responded to the survey.
Type D personality may be an important determinant of dissatisfaction with treatment and care among people with hypothyroidism.

NEUTRAL

Recap: A type D personality, marked by negative emotions and social disengagement, is present in more than half of people with treated hypothyroidism. This study, which involved over 3,500 hypothyroid individuals and was carried out by researchers throughout Europe, found a strong link between type D personality and unfavorable treatment outcomes, such as enduring symptoms and discontent.

This new relationship raises the possibility of common underlying causes or the possibility that people with type D personalities would view their symptoms and treatment more adversely. The results of this study warrant additional investigation into the influence of personality traits on the efficacy of treatment for hypothyroidism and patient satisfaction.

Important Information:.

It was discovered that more than half of the study participants with treated hypothyroidism had type D personalities.

Higher levels of anxiety, depression, and dissatisfaction with treatment outcomes were reported by people with type D personalities and hypothyroidism.

According to the research, a more thorough investigation of personality traits may open the door to tailored interventions meant to enhance patients’ quality of life and satisfaction with their hypothyroidism treatments.

The Endocrine Society is the source.

Type D personality is highly prevalent in hypothyroid individuals, according to new research published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

The disease known as hypothyroidism is caused by insufficient thyroid hormone production by the thyroid gland. Although normal thyroid hormone levels are achieved, between 10 and 15 percent of individuals with treated hypothyroidism still have persistent symptoms for which the underlying cause is unknown.

Although there hasn’t been any prior research on this relationship, type D personality, which is marked by pessimism, worry, stress, negative emotions, and social disengagement, is occasionally linked to poor health and a high symptom burden.

More than half of the over 3,500 participants in the current study who self-reported having treated hypothyroidism had type D personalities, according to the researchers’ survey. Inquiring about their quality of life and the reasons behind some patients’ dissatisfaction with their treatment outcomes allowed them to learn more.

“Those with type D personality and hypothyroidism may have worse treatment outcomes than people without type D personality,” said Petros Perros, M.D., the study’s lead investigator. of Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom’s Newcastle University. K.

“People with type D personality may view treatment outcomes more negatively, or type D personality and hypothyroidism share similar underlying causes,” are our two most likely interpretations, which may not be mutually exclusive. “.

It was confirmed that a few hypothyroid patients were not happy with the way they were treated and continued to have symptoms that could not be explained. Type D personalities with hypothyroidism were more likely to experience high levels of anxiety, depression, and treatment dissatisfaction, as well as persistent symptoms and a reduced quality of life.

It is necessary to conduct additional research to validate our results and ascertain whether personality traits can be used to predict the treatment response of recently diagnosed hypothyroidism patients. If so, research might be done especially on these patients to see if any treatments could lead to better results, according to Perros.

Additional authors of the study are Endre Vezekenyi Nagy from the University of Debrecen in Debrecen, Hungary; Enrico Papini from the Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Albano in Rome, Italy; Juan Abad-Madroñero and Alan J. Poots from the Picker Institute Europe in Oxford, England; Peter Lakwijk from the Thyroid Federation International in Hoofddorp, Netherlands; Floortje Mols from Tilburg University in Tilburg, Netherlands; and Laszlo Hegedüs from the Odense University Hospital in Odense, Denmark.

Funding: Institut Biochimique SA (IBSA) provided funding for this study.

About this news about personality research and hypothyroidism.

Written by Colleen Williams.

Endocrine Society, a source.

Endocrine Society contact: Colleen Williams.

Picture: Neuroscience News is credited with this picture.

Original Study: Disclosed under open access.

Petros Perros and colleagues published a study titled “Hypothyroidism and Type D Personality: Results From E-MPATHY, a Cross-sectional International Online Patient Survey.”. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Inabst.

Results from E-MPATHY, an international cross-sectional online patient survey, on hypothyroidism and type D personality.

Situation.

Even after reaching biochemical euthyroidism, 10–15 percent of hypothyroid individuals still have symptoms. We don’t know what the root causes are. Although it has not been researched in individuals with hypothyroidism, type D personality, a vulnerability factor for general psychological distress, is linked to poor health and a high burden of symptoms.

goal.

to look into type D personality in hypothyroidism and see if there are any correlations with other traits or patient-reported outcomes.

Style.

cross-sectional, multinational survey.

Configuring.

on the internet.

Players.

those who reported having hypothyroidism and were receiving treatment.

Intervention.

Questionnaire.

primary outcome indicators.

Type D personality and associations with baseline characteristics, control of the symptoms of hypothyroidism by medication, satisfaction with care and treatment of hypothyroidism, impact of hypothyroidism on everyday living.

Result.

A total of 3523 valid responses out of 3915 total responses were received. The percentage of people with type D personalities was 54.2%. A number of respondent characteristics (including age, marital status, ethnicity, household income, comorbidities, type of hypothyroidism treatment, most recent TSH level), anxiety, depression, somatization, poor medication-controlled hypothyroidism symptoms, dissatisfaction with hypothyroidism care and treatment, and a negative impact of hypothyroidism on everyday living were found to be statistically significantly correlated with type D personality.

Conversation.

According to the survey responses, a significant percentage of hypothyroidism patients had type D personalities. Those with hypothyroidism may be less satisfied with their care and treatment when they have a type D personality. Independent validation is necessary for our results. Close cooperation between the fields of psychology and thyroidology is probably going to be essential to furthering our knowledge in this field.

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