There is a chance of 2 feet of rain in Florida

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However, “regardless of development, heavy rainfall is expected across portions of Florida during the next few days,” the hurricane center said.
The system is expected to move northeast across Florida over the next few days, the hurricane center said.
Some areas could see almost two feet of rain, according to AccuWeather.
The weather service placed much of South Florida under flood watch, warning that multiple rounds of heavy rain could quickly lead to flooded roads and waterways above their flood table.
In the Florida Keys, rainfall totals could reach 2 to 3 inches by Wednesday evening, the weather service said.
In the same time frame, 6-9 inches of rain is expected to fall across Southwest Florida and the Lake Okeechobee region, with 2-5 inches of rain forecast for Miami.
In 2014, the first storm was Tropical Storm Arthur, which formed on July 1, 2014.
An updated forecast Klotzbach’s team issued an updated seasonal hurricane forecast Tuesday, which basically repeated the dire forecast made in April: An “extremely active Atlantic hurricane season” is likely, with as many as 23 named tropical storms and hurricanes possible.

NEGATIVE

The National Hurricane Center is predicting a 20 percent chance of development into a depression or tropical storm over the next seven days for a weather system that drenched much of Florida with heavy rain and thunderstorms on Tuesday, even though it is not officially a tropical storm. The weather system is linked to a tropical disturbance in the Gulf of Mexico.

The hurricane center stated that “heavy rainfall is expected across portions of Florida during the next few days, regardless of development.”.

The hurricane center stated that during the next few days, the system is predicted to move northeast across Florida. AccuWeather predicts that some places may experience nearly two feet of rain.

Watch for flooding issued.

The National Weather Service stated that flash flooding will mostly occur in isolated locations throughout the state due to the rain, with low-lying areas, roads, small streams, and urban areas being the most vulnerable.

Several rounds of heavy rain could quickly cause roads and waterways above their flood table, the weather service warned, placing much of South Florida under a flood watch.

By Wednesday night in the Florida Keys, the weather service predicted 2 to 3 inches of rain. Six to nine inches of rain are predicted for Southwest Florida and the Lake Okeechobee region during that same time period, with two to five inches predicted for Miami.

Rain to reduce the heat and drought.

At first, the rain will be helpful because, according to AccuWeather meteorologist Brandon Buckingham, “drought conditions have steadily increased across the peninsula throughout the spring months.”. The Sunshine State has been baking in record-breaking warmth for the past few weeks, but he said that the cloudy skies and rainy weather will put an end to it.

Weather report: Massive heat wave expected to intensify on Tuesday, with storms raking Florida and Texas.

Hurricane season is off to a slow start thus far.

In the Atlantic basin, which includes storms in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, no named tropical storm has formed as of yet in 2024. As per AccuWeather meteorologist Bernie Rayno, this is the latest start to the hurricane season in the last ten years. Tropical Storm Arthur was the first storm of 2014; it developed on July 1.

According to Rayno, the lack of storms in June is normal because wind shear and dry air are working together to prevent storm development in the Atlantic, which is common during this time of year.

Additionally, according to Philip Klotzbach, a meteorologist from Colorado State University who specializes in seasonal hurricane forecasts for the Atlantic basin, if no storms form over the course of the next week, it will only be the third time since 1970 that there have been no named storms in the Western Hemisphere through June 17.

an updated prediction.

In essence, the dire April forecast—that an “extremely active Atlantic hurricane season” is likely, with up to 23 named tropical storms and hurricanes possible—was repeated in an updated seasonal hurricane forecast released by Klotzbach’s team on Tuesday.

According to Colorado State University’s statement, “we anticipate a well above-average probability for major hurricanes making landfall along the continental United States coastline and in the Caribbean.”.

A Category 3 hurricane or higher, with maximum sustained winds of at least 111 mph, is considered a major hurricane.

Based on unusually warm Atlantic waters and the possibility of a storm-boosting La Niña pattern forming in the Pacific, the Colorado State forecast is consistent with many other seasonal hurricane forecasts predicting a busy season.

USA TODAY’s Christopher Cann and USA TODAY Network’s Cheryl McCloud both contributed.

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