The shots are linked to botulism-like illnesses

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Federal officials are trying to determine the source of Botox injections — some of the shots potentially counterfeits — linked to an outbreak of botulism-like illnesses in several U.S. states.
The Tennessee Department of Health reported four people in the state had been stricken with botulism-like symptoms, including two hospitalized after getting possible counterfeit injections.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the botulinum toxin injections — commonly called Botox —were done in “non-medical” settings, and “the sources of these botulinum toxin products are unknown or unverified.”
AbbVie and Allergan Aesthetics are the only authorized suppliers of Botox, and recent reports of potential botulism cases involved product “suspected to be counterfeit,” Allergen, the FDA-approved manufacturer of Botox told CBS MoneyWatch.
“In partnership with public health authorities, we have confirmed the security of our Botox and Botox cosmetic supply chain as well as the safety, quality, and efficacy of all products we manufacture and distribute,” Allergan stated.
The effects of a shot last three to four months on average, so additional shots are needed to remain wrinkle-free.
So-called iatrogenic botulism is caused by excessive exposure to the botulinum toxin, although confirmed cases occurring after cosmetic or therapeutic injections are rare, according to health officials.
The FDA urged people experiencing adverse effects or health care providers receiving patients with adverse effects to report them to the FDA MedWatch reporting program.

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The source of Botox injections, some of which may be fake, is being investigated by federal authorities in connection with an outbreak of illnesses resembling botulism in several U.S. s. states.

The Food and Drug Administration informed CBS MoneyWatch that it is collaborating with other federal and state organizations to determine the origin of an outbreak that has sickened at least six people who received botulinum toxin injections in Illinois and Tennessee.

According to the Tennessee Department of Health, two hospitalized individuals who may have received fake injections were among the four people in the state who experienced symptoms resembling botulism.

Following the hospitalization of two patients who developed symptoms such as blurred vision, droopy faces, and difficulty breathing, health officials in Illinois are cautioning medical professionals to be on the lookout for patients with botulism. Both were given injections by a LaSalle County licensed nurse who provided care without a prescription.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “non-medical” settings were used for the injections of botulinum toxin, also known as Botox, and “the sources of these botulinum toxin products are unknown or unverified.”. ****.

The only licensed providers of Botox are AbbVie and Allergan Aesthetics. According to Allergen, the FDA-approved producer of Botox, recent reports of possible botulism cases involved product “suspected to be counterfeit.”. “We have verified the safety, efficacy, and quality of every product we produce and distribute, as well as the security of our supply chain for Botox and Botox cosmetics, in collaboration with public health authorities,” Allergan said.

As per the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, Botox, which was approved over two decades ago for cosmetic purposes, is a widely used medication that helps people look younger and smooth wrinkles. An injection usually costs about $530. Further shots are required to maintain wrinkle-free skin because the effects of a shot typically last three to four months.

According to the CDC, infants may experience an intestinal form of botulism, which is a dangerous and occasionally fatal illness brought on by a toxin that can be spread through food or emerge from untreated wounds.

Health officials claim that excessive exposure to the botulinum toxin is the cause of so-called iatrogenic botulism, though confirmed cases following cosmetic or therapeutic injections are uncommon. Health professionals recommend that injections be performed using a licensed provider and an FDA-approved product.

The FDA asked patients who were having negative effects or medical professionals who were treating patients who were having negative effects to report them to the FDA MedWatch reporting program.

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