Eclipses from space collide over the US in a new satellite image

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North America has experienced two transcontinental total solar eclipses within the last seven years, and these satellite images compare the crisscrossing paths of totality.
Then, just about two weeks ago, on April 8, 2024, another total solar eclipse traveled from the Pacific to the Atlantic, but this time moved southwest to northeast.
Incredibly, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES-16 satellite tracked both total solar eclipses from space, documenting the location of the moon’s shadow cast upon Earth in 5- to 10-minute intervals.
“The size of the moon’s shadow on the Earth during the total solar eclipses were very different between 2017 and 2024,” officials said in a statement.
The images comprise multiple snapshots of the moon’s shadow as fell across different locations along the path of totality.
An overlay of images taken during the two solar eclipses really emphasizes how the paths of totality differed.
Related: Global ‘time signals’ subtly shifted as the total solar eclipse reshaped Earth’s upper atmosphere, new data shows The total solar eclipse in 2017 was visible from within a narrow corridor across Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.
By comparison, the April 8 total solar eclipse stretched across Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, culminating in southeastern Canada.

NEUTRAL

These satellite images compare the crisscrossing paths of totality from the two transcontinental total solar eclipses that have occurred in North America in the last seven years.

A total solar eclipse that crossed 14 U.S. states in 2017 traveled from northwest to southeast, passing through Oregon and South Carolina. S. For the first time in 99 years, states are border-to-border. Then, on April 8, 2024, a little over two weeks ago, there was yet another total solar eclipse that moved from the Pacific to the Atlantic, but this time it went from southwest to northeast.

Amazingly, the GOES-16 satellite of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tracked both total solar eclipses from space, recording the location of the moon’s shadow on Earth every five to ten minutes. Current composite photos contrast the two solar eclipses and their nearly opposing paths of totality, which span North America and are defined by the brief moment when the moon fully obscures the sun’s face.

“During the total solar eclipses in 2017 and 2024, the moon’s shadow on Earth was significantly different in size,” officials stated in a statement.

These photos are a collection of several images taken along the path of totality showing the moon’s shadow falling at various points. The two solar eclipses’ different paths of totality are clearly shown by an overlay of photos from each event. Videos of every solar eclipse were also produced using satellite imagery, and each one features a slider image that lets users flip between composite images and assess variations in the moon’s shadow’s length, width, and darkness.

Related: As the total solar eclipse changed the upper atmosphere of Earth, new data reveals a subtle shift in global “time signals.”.

A limited corridor spanning Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina allowed observers to see the 2017 total solar eclipse. In contrast, Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine were all covered by the total solar eclipse that occurred on April 8 before ending in southeast Canada.

The maximum duration of totality varied from approximately 2 minutes and 40 seconds in 2017 to up to 4 minutes and 28 seconds in 2024, among other noteworthy variations. Between the two solar eclipses in 2017, the path of totality was only 70 miles (113 km) wide, but in 2024 it was a staggering 115 miles (185 km) wide. This indicates another significant difference in path width. The reason behind the latter is that the sun will be nearing solar maximum later in the year.

published initially on Space.com.

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