Colorado dairy cows have bird flu

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DENVER (KKTV) – Avian influenza has been confirmed in dairy cows in Colorado, making the Centennial State the ninth in the U.S. to see the highly contagious virus jump from bird to cattle.
According to the state Department of Agriculture, the Colorado State Veterinarian Office was alerted on April 22 that a dairy herd in northeastern Colorado was exhibiting symptoms of H5N1, or the bird flu.
In cattle, bird flu symptoms include decreased feed intake, decreased milk production, and abnormal milk when it is produced.
“Samples submitted to the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory tested presumptive positive for HPAI on April 24 and were confirmed by the [U.S. Department of Agriculture] National Veterinary Services Laboratory on April 25,” the Colorado Department of Agriculture said.
Infected cattle do tend to recover, Colorado Department of Agriculture said.
One day prior to the confirmation of bird flu in Colorado cows, the USDA announced actions to limit the spread, including testing cows before they cross state lines.
“We continue to see this ongoing HPAI outbreak evolve and over the last month have seen transmission of the virus now move into dairy cattle.
“It is critically important that producers implement enhanced biosecurity measures to mitigate the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza.” More information on bird flu in Colorado can be found here and here.

NEUTRAL

DENVER (KKTV)-Colorado is now the ninth state in the union with confirmed cases of avian influenza in dairy cows. S. to witness the extremely contagious virus infect cattle instead of birds.

The Colorado State Veterinarian Office was notified on April 22 that a dairy herd in northeastern Colorado was displaying signs of H5N1, also known as the bird flu, according to the state Department of Agriculture. Reduced feed intake, abnormal milk production, and decreased milk production are all signs of bird flu in cattle.

The Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory received samples on April 24 that tested presumptively positive for HPAI; the [U. S. the Colorado Department of Agriculture said, “[Department of Agriculture] National Veterinary Services Laboratory on April 25.”.

According to the Colorado Department of Agriculture, infected cattle do typically recover.

The USDA announced steps to stop the spread, including testing cows before they cross state lines, one day before the virus was confirmed to have infected Colorado cows.

“This ongoing HPAI outbreak is still evolving, and in the past month, we’ve seen the virus spread to dairy cattle.”. In a statement released by the state Department of Agriculture, Colorado State Veterinarian Dr. Maggie Baldwin stated, “Although the exact mode of transmission of this virus is still unknown, we do know that it appears to be spreading from cow to cow and between herds.”. To slow down the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza, producers must take additional biosecurity precautions. “.

Here and here are some additional resources regarding bird flu in Colorado.

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