Adults face a higher risk of cancer

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Younger generations are aging more rapidly, and this could be leading to an increased risk of cancer, a new study says.
People born in or after 1965 are 17% more likely to be experiencing accelerated aging compared to seniors born between 1950 and 1954, researchers found.
Advertisement That faster aging is associated with a higher risk of certain cancers among adults younger than 55, also known as early-onset cancers, results show.
“Multiple cancer types are becoming increasingly common among younger adults in the United States and globally,” researcher Ruiyi Tian, a doctoral student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said in a news release.
Advertisement For each single-unit increase in accelerated aging, researcher found an increased risk of: 42% for early-onset lung cancer.
Accelerated aging also was associated with a 16% increased risk of late-onset GI cancer and a 23% increased risk of late-onset uterine cancer among older adults.
“By examining the relationship between accelerating aging and the risk of early-onset cancers, we provide a fresh perspective on the shared [causes] of early-onset cancers,” Tian said.
The team next will try to figure out why younger adults are aging at a faster pace, and why that is increasing their cancer risk.

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A recent study suggests that a higher risk of cancer may result from younger generations aging more quickly.

Researchers discovered that seniors born between 1950 and 1954 are not as likely to be experiencing accelerated aging as those born in or after 1965—by 17%.

Results indicate that faster aging is linked to an increased risk of early-onset cancers, or certain cancers that affect adults younger than 55.

According to researcher Ruiyi Tian, a doctoral candidate at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, “multiple cancer types are becoming increasingly common among younger adults in the United States and globally.”. Louis stated in a press release. To enhance the prevention or early detection of cancer in younger and future generations, it will be essential to comprehend the factors causing this increase. ****.

Researchers examined blood data for about 149,000 participants in the U.S. KK. project Biobank.

Each person’s biological age—the age at which a person appears to be based on the state of their body—was determined by the team using a set of nine biomarkers discovered in blood.

Subsequently, they compared that figure with the individual’s true age determined by their birthdate and any reported cases of cancer.

Researchers discovered a higher risk of: for every unit increase in accelerated aging.

41 percent in cases of lung cancer with early onset.

22 percent in the case of GI cancer with an early onset.

36% in cases of uterine cancer with early onset.

Additionally, among older adults, accelerated aging was linked to a 23 percent higher risk of late-onset uterine cancer and a 16 percent higher risk of late-onset GI cancer.

“We offer a new perspective on the common [causes] of early-onset cancers by investigating the association between accelerated aging and the risk of these diseases,” Tian stated.

“If confirmed, our results imply that slowing biological aging may offer a novel approach to cancer prevention, and screening programs targeted at younger people exhibiting signs of accelerated aging may aid in the early detection of cancers,” the researcher continued.

Next, the team will attempt to determine why the accelerated aging of younger adults is increasing their risk of cancer.

At a San Diego meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research on Sunday, researchers presented their findings. Research that are presented at medical conferences ought to be regarded as preliminary until they are published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information.

Regarding chronological age vs biological age, Northwestern Medicine has more information.

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