Our brains are getting bigger

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Over the years, their volume has increased, which may be good news for those who are at risk of dementia. Despite widespread theories to the contrary, evidence points to the expansion of human brains.
According to Newswise, UC Davis Health researchers compared MRIs of individuals born in the 1930s and 1970s and discovered that they had increased in both volume and surface area.
And a lower chance of dementia may accompany larger brains.
Forty-five years of research: The study was a component of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), which commenced seventy-five years ago and monitors thousands of participants—including some who are second and third generation—via a range of health markers.
In a recent paper, the brain sizes of 3,226 individuals were analyzed between 1999 and 2019. The results showed that participants born in the 1970s had a 16% increase in brain surface area and a 66% increase in brain volume.
For what reason are brains expanding?
According to Earth . com, improved nutrition during critical developmental stages of pregnancy and childhood is thought to play a significant role.
So how is this related to dementia?
Lead author Dr. Charles DeCarli says, “Larger brain structures like those observed in our study may reflect improved brain development and improved brain health.”.
“A larger brain structure may act as a buffer against the late-life effects of age-related brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. It also represents a larger brain reserve.”. “.”.
Neuroscience News and Research notes that the study’s participants were mostly non-Hispanic white individuals who were in good health and had a good education, but this is not a complete picture.
The study’s authors stated, “evidence suggests that social-cultural and health disparities, which are more prevalent among non-White individuals in the US, may negatively affect brain health.”.
Ancient brains: Although the FHS study spans 75 years, CNN notes that researchers may be able to identify brain diseases that have persisted longer by using an archive of ancient human brains.
According to Popular Mechanics, scientists have compiled a list of over 4,000 such brains, some dating as far back as 12,000 years.
Scientists are also attempting to learn more about how soft tissue survives for extended periods of time under certain conditions, as they clarify in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
(It seems the Greeks of antiquity were immune to dementia). ).
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There may be good news regarding dementia risks as their volume has increased over the years.

Despite numerous theories suggesting that humans are becoming less intelligent, data indicates that our brains are actually growing larger. When UC Davis Health researchers compared the MRIs of people born in the 1930s and 1970s, they discovered that they had increased in both volume and surface area, according to Newswise. Furthermore, a smaller chance of dementia may accompany larger brains.

Research spanning 75 years: The study was a component of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), which started 75 years ago and uses a variety of health markers to track thousands of participants, some of whom are second and third generation. In a recent paper, the brain sizes of 3,226 individuals were analyzed between 1999 and 2019. The results showed that participants born in the 1970s had a 16% increase in brain surface area and a 66% increase in brain volume.

Better nutrition during critical developmental periods during pregnancy and childhood is thought to be a major factor in why brains are growing (Earth . com).

How then does this relate to dementia? According to lead author Dr. Charles DeCarli, “larger brain structures like those observed in our study may reflect improved brain development and improved brain health.”. “A bigger brain structure is indicative of a larger brain reserve and may mitigate the effects of age-related brain diseases such as dementias related to Alzheimer’s disease in later life. ****.

Neuroscience News and Research notes that the study’s participants were mostly non-Hispanic white individuals who were in good health and had a good education, but this is not a complete picture. The study authors stated, “Present research suggests that brain health may be negatively impacted by social-cultural and health disparities, which are more prevalent among non-White people in the US.”.

Ancient brains: Although the FHS study spans 75 years, CNN notes that researchers may be able to identify brain diseases that have persisted longer by using an archive of ancient human brains. According to Popular Mechanics, researchers have identified over 4,000 of these brains, some dating back as much as 12,000 years. The scientists are also attempting to learn more about how the soft tissue survives for extended periods of time under certain conditions, as they clarify in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

(It appears that dementia was not a problem for the ancient Greeks. ( ).

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