7 EV charging stations have been built

None

Building 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations in the US by 2030 is a commitment made by President Biden a long time ago.
According to the White House, those stations would boost Americans’ confidence in buying and operating electric vehicles while also reducing carbon pollution in the nation.
Now, however, only seven EV charging stations are operational across four states, more than two years after Congress appropriated $7.5 billion to help build those stations.
Additionally, the slow build-out could impede the shift to electric vehicles as the Biden administration implements new emissions regulations for cars and trucks that will force a greater number of hybrid and electric vehicles to be driven on the road.
Alexander Laska, deputy director for transportation and innovation at the center-left think tank Third Way, said, “I think a lot of people who are watching this are getting concerned about the timeline.”.
Promotion Biden signed the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in November 2021, which allotted $7.5 billion for EV charging.
Of that, $5 billion in so-called “formula funding” was given to each state as part of the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, or NEVI, program in order to establish a fast charger network alongside major highways.
However, a Federal Highway Administration spokesman claims that, in just two years, the program has only produced seven operational charging stations, out of a total of 38 locations where drivers can charge their cars.
(As per an analysis by the EV policy analyst group Atlas Public Policy, the funding should be sufficient to build up to 20,000 charging spots, or about 5,000 stations. ( ).
In addition to being under construction in four other states, stations are currently operating in Hawaii, New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.
Contracts for the construction of the charging stations have been awarded by twelve more states; proposals have not yet been issued by seventeen states.
Advertisement Concerning the sluggish deployment of EV chargers, Republican members of the House of Representatives wrote a letter to the Biden administration last month with a number of inquiries.
Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers wrote, “We have serious concerns that American taxpayer dollars are being woefully mismanaged under your direction.”. Jeff Duncan (R-S. C. Morgan Griffith (R-Va.) and etc. ).
The letter went on, “The problems with these programs continue to grow—delays in charger delivery, concerns from States about labor contracting requirements, and minimum operating standards for chargers.”.
A portion of the delays are expected, according to Atlas Public Policy founder Nick Nigro.
He declared, “The money is going to state transportation agencies.”.
Before this law was passed, almost none of them had any prior experience installing charging stations for electric vehicles. “The process has taken up most of the first two years since the funding was approved,” Advertisement Nigro says. “States have to submit plans to the Biden administration for approval, solicit bids on the work, and then award funds.”.
In 2024, he continued, “I expect it to go much faster.”.
An FHWA representative stated via email, “We are building a national EV charging network from scratch, and we want to get it right.”.
We are making progress as states swiftly bring NEVI stations online, having developed program guidelines and collaborated with them to direct implementation plans. The new chargers are anticipated to meet far higher standards than earlier iterations of fast chargers, which contributes to their gradual rollout.
According to the Department of Energy, there are currently close to 10,000 “fast” charging stations in the US, more than 2,000 of which are Tesla Superchargers.
The most dependable fast-charging networks in the nation are Tesla Superchargers, some of which are accessible to drivers of other cars.
Advertisement However, a lot of fast chargers that aren’t made by Tesla are known for their dubious dependability and subpar performance.
Electrify America, the company Volkswagen founded following the company’s “Dieselgate” emissions scandal, has come under fire from EV supporters for squandering hundreds of millions of dollars on subpar chargers.
The business has stated that increasing dependability is a priority.
The data analytics business J. D.
According to Power, just 80% of all charging attempts made in the nation are successful.
According to Biden administration guidelines, among many other requirements, the new publicly funded chargers must be operational 97% of the time, provide 150kW of power at each charger, and be located no more than one mile from an interstate.
These regulations, according to EV policy experts, are essential for creating a strong national charging program, but they also impede the expansion of chargers.
There are numerous guidelines and specifications attached to this funding, according to Laska.
That is the aim of our endeavors. Advertisement: States have encountered difficulties obtaining permissions and supplying electricity to stations located in geographically isolated regions.
Nigro points out that each charging spot wi.
NEGATIVE

By 2030, President Biden has long pledged to have 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations constructed in the country. The White House claimed that those stations would reduce carbon pollution and give Americans more confidence when buying and operating electric vehicles.

However, just seven EV charging stations are currently operational across four states, more than two years after Congress approved $7.5 billion to help build out those stations. Additionally, the slow build-out could impede the shift to electric vehicles as the Biden administration implements new emissions regulations for cars and trucks that will force a greater number of hybrid and electric vehicles to be on the road.

The deputy director for innovation and transportation at the center-left think tank Third Way, Alexander Laska, said, “I think a lot of people who are watching this are getting concerned about the timeline.”.

EV charging was allocated $7.5 billion in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which was signed by Biden in November 2021. Out of that, $5 billion in so-called “formula funding” was given to each state to establish a fast charger network alongside major highways as part of the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure, or NEVI, program.

According to a Federal Highway Administration spokesman, however, the program has only resulted in 7 open charging stations out of a total of 38 locations where drivers can charge their cars after two years. (As per an analysis by the EV policy analyst group Atlas Public Policy, the funding should be sufficient to construct up to 20,000 charging spots, or about 5,000 stations. ) Stations are being built in four additional states and are currently operational in Hawaii, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.

Seventeen states have yet to submit proposals, while twelve more states have given contracts for the construction of the charging stations.

The slow rollout of EV chargers prompted a letter from Republican members of the House of Representatives to the Biden administration last month, asking a number of questions.

Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash) wrote, “We have serious concerns that American taxpayer dollars are being woefully mismanaged under your direction.”. Jeff Duncan (Red-Sec. C. ) as well as Morgan Griffith (R-Va. ). “Delays in charger delivery, concerns from States regarding labor contracting requirements, and minimum operating standards for chargers—these programs’ problems are only getting worse,” the letter went on.

Part of the delays are expected, according to Atlas Public Policy founder Nick Nigro. “The funds go to state transportation agencies,” he declared. Before this law was passed, almost all of them lacked any prior experience installing charging stations for electric vehicles. “.

According to Nigro, the procedure, which requires states to request funding, submit plans for approval to the Biden administration, and then request bids for the work, has taken the majority of the first two years since the funding was authorized. In 2024, “I expect it to go much faster,” he continued.

An FHWA representative stated via email, “We are building a national EV charging network from scratch, and we want to get it right.”. As states swiftly bring NEVI stations online, we are making progress after creating program guidelines and working with them to direct implementation strategies. “.

The new chargers will likely be subject to far stricter regulations than earlier iterations of fast chargers, which is one reason for the gradual rollout. According to the Department of Energy, there are presently close to 10,000 “fast” charging stations in the US, more than 2,000 of which are Tesla Superchargers. The most dependable fast-charging networks in the nation are Tesla Superchargers, some of which are accessible to users of other makes and models.

However, a lot of fast chargers that aren’t Tesla have a bad reputation for being unreliable and performing poorly. Electrify America, a company founded by Volkswagen following the company’s “Dieselgate” emissions scandal, has come under fire from EV supporters for squandering hundreds of millions of dollars on subpar chargers. According to the company, they are aiming to increase dependability. The analytics startup J. D. According to Power, only 80% of all charging attempts made in the nation are successful.

According to Biden administration guidelines, among many other requirements, the new publicly funded chargers must be operational 97% of the time, provide 150kW of power at each charger, and be located no more than one mile from an interstate.

Experts in EV policy say that while those requirements are necessary to create a strong national charging program, they also impede the expansion of chargers. According to Laska, “there are dozens of rules and requirements with this funding.”. That embodies the essence of our endeavors. “.

States have also encountered difficulties obtaining permits and supplying electricity to stations that may be located in somewhat isolated areas. As Nigro notes, the maximum power needed for each charging station will be equivalent to about 20 homes, which will be a significant increase for local utilities that are not accustomed to installing chargers.

The public program won’t provide all of the chargers used in the country. In addition, private businesses are putting in place Level 2—a slightly slower—charging standard in apartment buildings and workplaces as part of their efforts to broaden the country’s charging network.

However, the NEVI program’s chargers would roughly double the nation’s fast charging capacity, which is essential for reducing “range anxiety” and assisting Americans in switching to battery electric vehicles. States just need to start constructing them.

It’s just that some of the rest of us are operating with a different urgency than the states, according to Laska.

scroll to top